The Wounded Warrior

Sculpture of the Dying Gaul at the Capitoline Museum in Rome. A Gallic warrior collapses from the mortal wound to his chest. On display through March 16, 2014, at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. (Photo credit) A mask, painted by a Marine who attends art therapy to relieve post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms, is … Continue reading

30%. Gone.

As of May, more than 5.5 million people had fled their homes as a result of the conflict in Syria. That’s nearly 30% of the country, or 1.5 million refugees outside of Syria and 4 million people displaced within the border. When I first read those numbers, I found myself imagining 1/3 of my building … Continue reading

What We Really Think of First Responders

After the recent tragedies in Boston and West, many of us celebrated the incredible stories of first responders. These were the people who ran back into the fray after the explosions, who searched for bodies in the rubble, who sacrificed their own safety and security to give blood, clothing, medical care, and whatever else was … Continue reading

What Does Australia Think of Our Asia Pivot?

While in Australia back in February I came across the Medical Association for Prevention of War. Curious, I walked into their office and wound up in an interesting dialogue with Nancy Atkin, the Executive Officer. I’ve been wanting to write about our conversation for some time since. It was a real treat to sit with … Continue reading

We Don’t Need a War Tax

I’m now going to respond to an op-ed piece in the New York Times, which I suggest you read first. In the article, entitled “A Tax to Pay for War,” R. Russell Rumbaugh – an Army veteran and a former analyst at the Central Intelligence Agency and the Senate Budget Committee – argues that we … Continue reading

Where Have All the Peace Activists Gone?

On Sunday I attended the Inaugural Peace Ball, where activists from across the country gathered to celebrate successes in the fight for peace and refocus their energies on areas that still need work. Ralph Nader was one of the keynote speakers. In a brief but passionate address, he discussed one of the key issues in … Continue reading

South Sudan, a Year Later

(This week, South Sudan celebrates its first Independence Day. It’s been a tough year for the new country, and even more difficult times may be ahead. So I asked the resident expert Michael to shed some light on the situation for us.) There are four major issues happening right now to keep in mind regarding … Continue reading

We Aren’t the Only Ones Who Go to War Over Oil

South Sudan has been in the news lately because of escalating attacks from Sudan on its northern border. The cause? Oil disputes. In fact, as of yesterday the president of South Sudan claimed that Sudan had effectively “declared war” on his country after air bombardments continued for yet another day. Those bombings followed South Sudan’s … Continue reading

Is Raising Awareness the First Step?

I wanted to follow-up briefly on my post earlier this week about Kony 2012 and the complexity of true compassion. It bothers me that modern media, whether videos, blogs, or photographs, is so truncated. I realize that in discussing the over-simplification of Kony 2012, I too simplified a complicated issue. Nick Kristof’s column in The … Continue reading

Bearing Our Own Energy Burden

The Keystone XL pipeline – once relatively unknown to everyone but energy execs and protestors – has become a major US election issue and the source of much controversy lately. The proposed pipeline would carry oil 2,000 miles from Canada’s tar sands through the US and down to Texas. Environmental activists have been fighting the … Continue reading

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