Good News Friday

Happy Friday, folks! I have been MIA as I finish two big writing projects before their deadlines. Hopefully I can get them both out in the next day or two. Then I plan to spend a week or so detoxing from my (now severe) addiction to coffee. Here’s some good news to boost you into … Continue reading

Follow-up to “Stuck Between There and Nowhere”

[This is a follow-up to my article at Reject Apathy about refugees who suffer from being encamped long-term, and possible solutions to the problem. Check it out!] For those who have read it, here are some additional ways you can get involved with this issue: Look past the emergency – Often once the media hype … Continue reading

The Way of Generous Love

by Gerard Stolk I got up early for the Royal Wedding this morning. There were a ton of living room lights shining in our building, so I wasn’t alone with my high tea and shortbread. Michael eventually joined me, and we watched the BBC broadcast of the event, which was impressively produced (and, as an … Continue reading

Royal Wedding Worldview

Westminster Abbey, I think, where the Royals are getting married, I think, and which I’ll be watching next Friday, I think. A lover of big events that mean essentially nothing, I wanted to have a royal wedding viewing party, complete with high tea and jokes about the Brits. You know, like the time we watched … Continue reading

Underground Prisons

Libya just released four New York Times journalists. This is wonderful news, especially after Libya’s secretive, underground prison system made headlines last week. Libya is rather infamous for wrongful imprisonment and mistreatment of convicts, including the alleged massacre at Abu Salim, but it is certainly not alone in prisoner abuse. Indeed the wrongful imprisonment of … Continue reading

To Libya

Libyan Protesters in DuPont Circle, Washington D.C. / June 2010 For nearly two weeks I’ve been watching with excitement and dread as the Libyan people have fought, bled, and died fighting against their dictatorial regime. I feel a special closeness to the people there, even though we’ve never met and mostly differ in language, religion, … Continue reading

The Marginalized Families of Abu Salim Prison

Abu Salim Protest in DuPont Circle – Washington, DC 6/26/10 1996. A mother and her young daughter walk under a tough Libyan sun to the gate of Abu Salim Prison. They have come to see her son, the girl’s older brother, who was imprisoned a year earlier for speaking out against the regime of Muammar … Continue reading

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