Inaugural Peace Ball

Just a quick heads up that I’ll be covering the Inaugural Peace Ball live tonight from Arena Stage at The Mead Center For American Theater here in DC. The event, which celebrates recent campaigns for peace while also reflecting and refocusing on the many efforts still to be done, will include guests Ralph Nader (you … Continue reading

Guantanamo: Ten Years Later

Tomorrow Guantanamo turns 10, and all over the country protestors plan to mark the day with calls to close the prison center. In particular, activists will travel from around the United States to Washington, DC, for a rally and human chain meant to stretch from the White House to the Capitol. In the last 10 … Continue reading

A Zagat for Bleeding Hearts

Next time your waiter brings you that side of fries, how do you know she hasn’t coughed a nasty stomach virus onto it? Who can a busboy talk to about having his wages stolen from him? When a line cook leaves work, does he have a place to call home? Earlier this month, Restaurant Opportunities … Continue reading

We Need Cleaner Air and Cleaner Hearts

Last week NPR featured a series on poisoned places exposing the ways polluted air continues to harm residents all over the US. When I heard this report on All Things Considered, I recognized the place immediately: thick fog, benzene in the air, burning eyes and throats, obscure cancers. Perhaps this was LaBelle, PA – the … Continue reading

Good News Friday

Happy Veterans Day, and a huge thank you in particular to my favorite veteran: my dad. Dad fought as a lieutenant with the Marines in Vietnam and has continued his fight in a very different way in the decades that follow. I’m proud to have been raised by someone with his courage; and I’m inspired … Continue reading

Mob Guilt and Mob Mercy

Last night I saw Parade at Ford’s Theatre. Lucky SOBs: they scheduled a musical about the wrongful imprisonment and execution of a man in Georgia at conveniently the exact same time the Troy Davis case entered national consciousness. Add to that the looming seat stage left, draped in flags for an assassinated President Lincoln, then … Continue reading

Doubt, Execution, and Collective Bloodlust

This week my Twitter account went all a-flutter over a man named Troy Davis. Troy Davis has served on Georgia’s death row for 20 years now, found guilty based on the testimonies of key witnesses. In the two decades since his conviction of murdering a police officer, 7 of the 9 witnesses have recanted or … Continue reading

Caring for the Half-Widows

Half-widows, as they’re currently called in Kashmir, actually suffer all over the world – from India to Libya, Chile to Eastern Europe. Some have more difficulties than others, but all share one thing in common: their husbands vanished because of forced disappearance. Forced disappearance – also known as “enforced disappearance” or just “disappearance,” happens when … Continue reading

Jeremiahs or Babel-Builders?

This article depresses me. And this one. And this one. If you can believe it, what gets me down is not the slideshow from the Washington Post showing victims of the Horn of Africa famine. What depresses me is that, with my husband studying most days now, I have few people to talk with about … Continue reading

The West Memphis Three on Freedom and Maintaining Their Innocence

Hear from the West Memphis Three – Damien Echols, Jason Baldwin and Jessie Misskelley Jr. – on being free from prison (Echols after a decade in solitary), maintaining one’s innocence, and the difficult decision to plead guilty anyway:

  • Copyright

    ©TheMarginalized.com