Happier Holidays Part 2: Happy Thanksgiving!

(This is the second post in a series on enriching your holiday festivities with acts of generosity.) Before leaving for a Thanksgiving break of sorts, I wanted to wish you all a lovely holiday! May joy and gratitude fill your homes in the next few days and bless your families with a deeper sense of … Continue reading

Happier Holidays Part 1: Throw a Charity Ball

(This is the first post in a series on enriching your holiday festivities with acts of generosity.) This weekend abolitionists will don gowns and tuxes for the Capital City Ball in DC. Now in its fifth year, this gala sprang up when a group of friends decided to turn their holiday party into a fundraiser … Continue reading

Hunger + Hunger = Generosity

In researching a writing project, I recently came across what has to be one of the most beautiful stories in American history. Perhaps you’re already familiar with the Choctaw Indians and their incredible display of generosity during the 1840s. Regardless, read on because it’s worth the reminder: Beginning in the early 1830s, the US government … Continue reading

The Cure for Donor Fatigue: Start with the Soul

Let’s assume you’re one of those people who sets aside money for charitable causes/tithing/etc. When you sit down to write your checks, do you choose devastated and ignored Japan? Famished Africa? Recovering Haiti? Or the cancer walk your niece is helping to plan? If you’re like many people in 2011, you get overwhelmed, annoyed, and … Continue reading

Jeremiahs or Babel-Builders?

This article depresses me. And this one. And this one. If you can believe it, what gets me down is not the slideshow from the Washington Post showing victims of the Horn of Africa famine. What depresses me is that, with my husband studying most days now, I have few people to talk with about … Continue reading

The Way of Generous Love

by Gerard Stolk I got up early for the Royal Wedding this morning. There were a ton of living room lights shining in our building, so I wasn’t alone with my high tea and shortbread. Michael eventually joined me, and we watched the BBC broadcast of the event, which was impressively produced (and, as an … Continue reading

The Sound of Music and the Marginalized

Displaced people have a reputation of being primarily non-Western. It is easy in the United States to see them as foreign and other. Then Katrina happens. New Orleans and other Gulf towns get flushed out by the storm and cities from Houston to Boston start taking in the refugees, offering beds and canned food and … Continue reading

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