Ruined

This weekend I saw Ruined at Arena Stage in DC. I’d been waiting over a year to see this Pulitzer prize winner – ever since I first heard about it, really. Playwright Lynn Nottage wrote the piece after traveling to Africa to interview refugee women who had been victimized by the war in Congo. She … Continue reading

Not a Touchdown Yet

It was really awesome to see how much press human trafficking got before the Super Bowl. It felt like everywhere I turned, from Facebook to local news, people were banding together and joining the cause. I know a number of folks down in Texas added the National Human Trafficking Hotline to their phones, and groups … Continue reading

Who Chooses Our Neighbors?

Refugee Camp in Congo – by Julien Harneis Determining who gets to be resettled is a long process. Out of all of the world’s refugees, approximately 700,000+ are estimated to need resettlement. Out of those people, only about 10% can be resettled, which results in 1% of the world’s refugees resettling to third countries. But … Continue reading

Calling Iraq Home

Today we’re starting a three-part series on internal displacement in Iraq. With some recent reports about alleged brutalities in Afghanistan, international news has refocused for a bit on some of the casualties of the wars taking place in the Middle East. War and forced migration go together as a common casualty of war. Inevitably, ongoing … Continue reading

I Now Pronounce You Home

Burma on the map Mya* and Kywe* were born and raised in Burma. They met in Sunday School and grew up together. About ten years ago, Mya and Kywe got married. Only a few months later, they began planning a way out. They won’t say what finally convinced them to leave their homeland. Was it … Continue reading

Cancer Come and Me Wan’ Go Home

Bananas in the Store – by Steve Hopson, http://www.stevehopson.com In the last few decades, a large number of workers have migrated toward the banana plantations. That’s right, toward them. Even though the industry is corrupt and life is hard on a banana farm, many migrants feel any check is better than no check, and bananas … Continue reading

Come, Mister Tally Man

A few years ago, I was walking through the fruit section of my local co-op. I was in upstate New York, so it was no surprise that to my left I saw apples and berries. But set out on a little table in the middle I also saw some bananas, hailed as local grub from … Continue reading

Why Palestine?

Recently this blog began dedicating a regular column to the Israeli/Palestinian situation – its conflicts, its history, and most importantly, its people. Why write about Palestine on a blog about forced migration? They seem pretty settled, with homes and jobs. The Palestinian experience usually looks nothing like that of women in the Congo, fleeing for … Continue reading

Musicals About the Marginalized

There are more musicals on forced migration than can be mentioned in a week. Here is a list of some popular ones we didn’t get to: Oliver! Features child slavery Miss Saigon Lead character an orphaned refugee from the Vietnam War Parade An example of wrongful imprisonment Aida Discusses the slavery of Nubians in Egypt … Continue reading

Forced Migration, Providence and the Road to Haven

I write about forced migration for a lot of reasons, and a key reason is to keep myself and anyone interested from becoming despondent and disconnected with the world. But when a friend dies, all bets are off. Nothing feels the way it is supposed to, and disconnection becomes completely justifiable. Yesterday a good friend … Continue reading

  • Copyright

    ©TheMarginalized.com