Thanksgiving Over Not Writing (About Some Things)

Don’t be fooled by the title. I’m planning to write over Thanksgiving, and I’m planning to love it. However, I won’t be writing about human trafficking. And that’s something I’m grateful for this year. Leading up to Thanksgiving, I’ve noticed an onslaught of information about human trafficking on the web and in conversation. First there … Continue reading

Convict Porters and the Long Mile

Earlier this week, I interviewed my husband Michael about some of the human rights concerns in Burma / Myanmar. In his answer, he cited the problem of forced portering, in which the Burmese army takes people from villages and forces them to walk with heavy loads on their backs. This form of slavery has particular … Continue reading

On Burma: An Interview with Michael Miller

Recently I discussed some problems plaguing South Sudan and announced my husband will be working with that country as a research associate for PILPG. But there’s a second country he’s assisting, too: Burma! Since he just finished his first year of law school, he has some time on his hands for a few weeks. So … Continue reading

Good News Friday

I’ve been really excited about this Good News Friday because I missed a week for the holiday and thus had a ton to share. At the same time, I’m running on no sleep. So in fear this post will spiral into a… rerhaldskf… mush of… aweh sadkf fb=… bad spelling and… aldf ehjkef… grammar mistakes… … Continue reading

Good News Friday

My good news is that, while the rest of the country is sweltering, I’m in the one cool state. I’m actually kind of freezing right now. This weekend we’re hoping to see Glacier National Park, which has about seven feet of snow, according to our very pregnant relative who went sledding up there (because that’s … Continue reading

Shopping for Slavery

The following list by the US Department of Labor outlines products that are known to be created by forced or indentured child labor, also known as child slavery. Note the repeated presence of certain countries, like Burma. Also note that these products and places do not make up a complete list. As the abolitionist movement … Continue reading

I Now Pronounce You Home

Burma on the map Mya* and Kywe* were born and raised in Burma. They met in Sunday School and grew up together. About ten years ago, Mya and Kywe got married. Only a few months later, they began planning a way out. They won’t say what finally convinced them to leave their homeland. Was it … Continue reading

Tea: Debt and Migration

Who knew that a regular job producing a commodity the entire world consumes could lead to so much insecurity? Many women across the globe pick tea leaves in an effort to feed their families and provide education to their children. Despite the rain-or-shine, labor-intensive duties and low pay, the job provides income and, in many … Continue reading

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