We Don’t Need a War Tax

I’m now going to respond to an op-ed piece in the New York Times, which I suggest you read first. In the article, entitled “A Tax to Pay for War,” R. Russell Rumbaugh – an Army veteran and a former analyst at the Central Intelligence Agency and the Senate Budget Committee – argues that we … Continue reading

Where Have All the Peace Activists Gone?

On Sunday I attended the Inaugural Peace Ball, where activists from across the country gathered to celebrate successes in the fight for peace and refocus their energies on areas that still need work. Ralph Nader was one of the keynote speakers. In a brief but passionate address, he discussed one of the key issues in … Continue reading

Inaugural Peace Ball

Just a quick heads up that I’ll be covering the Inaugural Peace Ball live tonight from Arena Stage at The Mead Center For American Theater here in DC. The event, which celebrates recent campaigns for peace while also reflecting and refocusing on the many efforts still to be done, will include guests Ralph Nader (you … Continue reading

South Sudan, a Year Later

(This week, South Sudan celebrates its first Independence Day. It’s been a tough year for the new country, and even more difficult times may be ahead. So I asked the resident expert Michael to shed some light on the situation for us.) There are four major issues happening right now to keep in mind regarding … Continue reading

We Aren’t the Only Ones Who Go to War Over Oil

South Sudan has been in the news lately because of escalating attacks from Sudan on its northern border. The cause? Oil disputes. In fact, as of yesterday the president of South Sudan claimed that Sudan had effectively “declared war” on his country after air bombardments continued for yet another day. Those bombings followed South Sudan’s … Continue reading

Ways to Help Central Africa and Countries Affected by the LRA

In response to my recent criticism of Nick Kristof’s Kony2012 column, one commenter asked that I offer up better solutions: I personally would prefer it if “armchair theorists” who have taken Invisible Children to task would also say things like, ‘Although I will not be joining the Kony 2012 campaign, I did make a small … Continue reading

Is Raising Awareness the First Step?

I wanted to follow-up briefly on my post earlier this week about Kony 2012 and the complexity of true compassion. It bothers me that modern media, whether videos, blogs, or photographs, is so truncated. I realize that in discussing the over-simplification of Kony 2012, I too simplified a complicated issue. Nick Kristof’s column in The … Continue reading

How to Get the World to Care About You in 1 Easy Step

Well, I’m back. I thought about waiting until after this Kony 2012 fiasco fizzled out, but instead I find myself with so many thoughts about it that I – forgive me world – feel obligated to toss my own $.02 into the fountain of cynical banter. In case you haven’t seen it yet (and with … Continue reading

Bearing Our Own Energy Burden

The Keystone XL pipeline – once relatively unknown to everyone but energy execs and protestors – has become a major US election issue and the source of much controversy lately. The proposed pipeline would carry oil 2,000 miles from Canada’s tar sands through the US and down to Texas. Environmental activists have been fighting the … Continue reading

Beauty and Horror: Susan Crile

I’m thrilled to share the work of a thoughtful visual artist with you today: Susan Crile (susancrile.com). She has worked extensively on themes of conflict. Her series In Our Name depicts images of torture at the hand of U.S. forces. Her Abu Ghraib pieces show the now infamous photographs from that scandal in a different … Continue reading

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