White Guilt vs. White Redemption

Writers like me get accused a lot of appealing to people’s white guilt, so I figured I’d address that today. By “like me” I mean a white girl from an affluent family who grew up in the burbs only to become some bleeding-heart idealist hippie spouting words like “oppression,” “disenfranchisement” and “Africa.” Take this definition … Continue reading

Jeremiahs or Babel-Builders?

This article depresses me. And this one. And this one. If you can believe it, what gets me down is not the slideshow from the Washington Post showing victims of the Horn of Africa famine. What depresses me is that, with my husband studying most days now, I have few people to talk with about … Continue reading

Osama Bin Laden and Our Culture of Death

I might be the only person on Earth besides a terrorist to feel sad when I found out Osama Bin Laden was dead. It wasn’t because I liked the guy. It was because I woke up at around 1am last night to shouting, chanting, and even some illegal fireworks outside my window. Groggy and annoyed, … Continue reading

The Way of Generous Love

by Gerard Stolk I got up early for the Royal Wedding this morning. There were a ton of living room lights shining in our building, so I wasn’t alone with my high tea and shortbread. Michael eventually joined me, and we watched the BBC broadcast of the event, which was impressively produced (and, as an … Continue reading

What Are You Giving for Lent?

Last spring I decided that I would give up slave-made chocolate and I invited other people to join me. It happened to be around Ash Wednesday, so it became a sort of Lenten observation, and a number of friends, family and readers jumped on board. Now it has been a year. A whole year! It’s … Continue reading

Memorializing the Marginalized

Ernst Barlach’s “Schlafende Vagabunden” (Sleeping Drifters) 1912 Yesterday I heard about two homeless men who were killed in Baltimore this past week. A man had tried to rob them, they didn’t have anything, and so then he killed them. It reminded me of a memorial service that is held in Atlanta every year for the … Continue reading

The Unreasonableness of Love

Late last week I received an e-mail from Voice of the Martyrs, an organization dedicated to helping Christians around the world who face religious persecution. The e-mail tells of a Christian lawyer in northwestern Pakistan who was defending another Christian in court against exorbitant interest rates. His name was Edwin Paul, and he had been … Continue reading

Faith-Based and Slave-Free

Many churches, temples and other faith-based organizations serve coffee, tea and cocoa to their attendants. Increasingly these groups want to see their consumer choices reflect a heart for justice and compassion, so many are turning to Fair Trade and other ethically grown products. Why the switch? Cocoa farms in West Africa grow most of the … Continue reading

Tea and the Marginalized

There may be no greater connection between one world and another than tea. In tea we pick the grasses and leaves of our native lands and ship them to another people who look and think differently than we do. Those people prepare the grasses and leaves in water and consume their essence. We drink the … Continue reading

Micah Calling for Justice

This statue of the prophet Micah stands outside the moot court auditorium at Georgetown University. Below it a plaque quotes Micah’s words: He has showed you, O man what is good. And what does the Lord require of you? To act justly and to love mercy, And to walk humbly with your God.

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