Beauty and Horror: Susan Crile

I’m thrilled to share the work of a thoughtful visual artist with you today: Susan Crile (susancrile.com). She has worked extensively on themes of conflict. Her series In Our Name depicts images of torture at the hand of U.S. forces. Her Abu Ghraib pieces show the now infamous photographs from that scandal in a different … Continue reading

Guantanamo: Ten Years Later

Tomorrow Guantanamo turns 10, and all over the country protestors plan to mark the day with calls to close the prison center. In particular, activists will travel from around the United States to Washington, DC, for a rally and human chain meant to stretch from the White House to the Capitol. In the last 10 … Continue reading

Human Rights in China: An Interview with the Laogai Museum’s Harry Wu

I recently visited the Laogai Museum and wrote a bit about it for We Love DC. In the process I also spoke with the museum’s director Harry Wu. Wu is a survivor of the Laogai prisons – a forced labor system in China to which he was sentenced for political crimes. After moving to the … Continue reading

Ending the “Kill and Dump” Policy in Balochistan

I’ll be the first to admit I don’t know much about Balochistan. (Balochi-what? Is that the place Herman Cain calls Stan-Stan?) No, Balochistan is in the southwest region of Pakistan. It spans nearly half of the country, but the population is much more sparse, making up only 5%. And it’s getting sparser… Enforced disappearances in … Continue reading

The Myth of the Missing

My high school Spanish teacher first sparked my interest in human rights when she showed us two films during senior year: The Mission and Missing. Both discuss atrocities in South America. The Mission portrays the massacre of a South American native tribe, and Missing shows the fallout when family members investigate the enforced disappearance of … Continue reading

Caring for the Half-Widows

Half-widows, as they’re currently called in Kashmir, actually suffer all over the world – from India to Libya, Chile to Eastern Europe. Some have more difficulties than others, but all share one thing in common: their husbands vanished because of forced disappearance. Forced disappearance – also known as “enforced disappearance” or just “disappearance,” happens when … Continue reading

Good News Friday

It’s Friday! Good news time! 1. Georgia Kicks Human Trafficking’s Ass Georgia has passed one of the toughest laws on human trafficking in the country. A major hub for traffickers, Georgia will now require a 25-year minimum sentence for anyone convicted of using coercion to traffic someone under the age of 18. Relative to other … Continue reading

Happy Birthday, Amnesty International!

I love social media because it’s not like the 3rd grade. On Twitter, when I ask someone to invite me to their party, they do. Yesterday it was Amnesty International, which is celebrating their 50th anniversary today and having parties around the world right now to celebrate their work. I attended the DC party near … Continue reading

Underground Prisons

Libya just released four New York Times journalists. This is wonderful news, especially after Libya’s secretive, underground prison system made headlines last week. Libya is rather infamous for wrongful imprisonment and mistreatment of convicts, including the alleged massacre at Abu Salim, but it is certainly not alone in prisoner abuse. Indeed the wrongful imprisonment of … Continue reading

Let the Little Sparrows Die

It is freezing in DC right now, and I spent the afternoon yesterday watching rain turn to snow from the cafe where I was working. Rain, then sleet actually, then slush, then snow. I was finishing the outline for one last final go at the screenplay I’m adapting from Hungarian playwright Andras Visky’s Juliet. It … Continue reading

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