Why Would Uganda Kill the Gays?

An infamous piece of legislation still looms in Uganda – the “Kill the Gays” bill, which would punish homosexuality with the death penalty. Homosexuality is already illegal in Uganda, but that law is rarely if ever enforced. Ugandan public sentiment on sexuality ranges across all corners of the spectrum. So if there’s already a law … Continue reading

Does the President Have the Authority?

On Wednesday Rand Paul led a 13-hour filibuster to delay John Brennan’s nomination to be CIA director. It stemmed from a correspondence he’d received earlier from Attorney General Eric Holder. Paul had asked Holder if “the President has the power to authorize lethal force, such as a drone strike, against a US citizen on US … Continue reading

“I’m Sorry” Is the First Step

(FYI: If you haven’t already, read the post on Australia’s Stolen Generations for more background to this story). It was 2008, and thousands of Aboriginal Australians gathered in the Australian capital city of Canberra. Across the country, many more thousands of people gathered in plazas and remote towns, where screens had been set up to … Continue reading

Where Have All the Peace Activists Gone?

On Sunday I attended the Inaugural Peace Ball, where activists from across the country gathered to celebrate successes in the fight for peace and refocus their energies on areas that still need work. Ralph Nader was one of the keynote speakers. In a brief but passionate address, he discussed one of the key issues in … Continue reading

Inaugural Peace Ball

Just a quick heads up that I’ll be covering the Inaugural Peace Ball live tonight from Arena Stage at The Mead Center For American Theater here in DC. The event, which celebrates recent campaigns for peace while also reflecting and refocusing on the many efforts still to be done, will include guests Ralph Nader (you … Continue reading

The Global Impact of Debt and the Arts

After Chen Guangcheng’s epic escape from house arrest in China, I wrote about how debt can keep us from doing good in the world. At the same time, I’m often writing about how important the arts are for human rights, and vice versa. So it should come as no surprise that all three are connected: … Continue reading

Samizdat: Underground Resistance Made Public

Samizdat means “self-published.” A Russian term, it refers to any underground publication banned during Communist rule in the USSR and Soviet bloc. It includes essays, books, art, poems – whether original or copied, it was all illegal. Yesterday I attended the opening of Samizdat: The Czech Art of Resistance 1968-1989 at the Embassy of the … Continue reading

On Burma: An Interview with Michael Miller

Recently I discussed some problems plaguing South Sudan and announced my husband will be working with that country as a research associate for PILPG. But there’s a second country he’s assisting, too: Burma! Since he just finished his first year of law school, he has some time on his hands for a few weeks. So … Continue reading

You Can’t Lend a Hand When Your Arms Are Tied

Tell me this won’t make an amazing movie: Chen Guangcheng, one of the best-known and most politically savvy Chinese dissidents, evaded security forces surrounding his home this week and, aided by an underground network of human rights activists, secretly made his way about 300 miles to Beijing, where he is believed to have found refuge … Continue reading

Tweets Re: North Korean Gulags

Thank you to everyone who followed along yesterday with my live tweets from the Hidden Gulag conference here in DC. It was a really fascinating event, and as you could probably tell I tried to capture as much as possible on Twitter. Before I post any further thoughts and resources, I wanted to give you … Continue reading

  • Copyright

    ©TheMarginalized.com