Children Become Artists Become Journalists Become Darfur.

You’re fluent in international development, human rights law, medicine, or the arts? That’s amazing! But when it comes to rallying the rest of us, sometimes we need to be sold on the idea in our own native tongue, with strong communication. I was just talking with a co-worker about the need for non-profits to translate … Continue reading

Doing Good on Yom HaShoah

Today was Yom HaShoah – Holocaust Remembrance Day. As a Jewish commemoration, it ends in the evening at sundown rather than at midnight. It is a time to reflect and remember, and a chance to refocus our energy on preventing similar atrocities. Unfortunately, the latter half of the 20th century tells a different story than … Continue reading

Terra Spiritus…with a darker shade of pale

Bea Maddock is one of Australia’s most influential contemporary artists. Her most recent works often consider place and memory, importance of the land, and the way Australia remembers and preserves multiple views of history. Nowhere are these themes more evident than in her piece “Terra Spiritus…with a darker shade of pale” at the National Gallery of … Continue reading

The Fitzroy Aboriginal Heritage Trail

Fitzroy is a dynamic little neighborhood just north of Melbourne’s city center. The narrow streets and pedestrian laneways buzz with shops and cafes that show off its rich immigrant history. As one of the city’s most up-and-coming areas, Fitzroy is an expensive place to live. Ironically it’s also a cultural hub for the state of … Continue reading

“I’m Sorry” Is the First Step

(FYI: If you haven’t already, read the post on Australia’s Stolen Generations for more background to this story). It was 2008, and thousands of Aboriginal Australians gathered in the Australian capital city of Canberra. Across the country, many more thousands of people gathered in plazas and remote towns, where screens had been set up to … Continue reading

Walking the Land of Our Fathers

I’m in East Tennessee right now, writing from my hotel, where the rooms overlook the Smokies and everyone calls me “dearie.” Every time I come here, I feel closer to my father than before. He was born here and comes from a large, historic Kingsport family that had deep ties to the land and the … Continue reading

The Normal Heart and Larry Kramer’s Letter

As part of my post today, I’d like to direct you over to We Love DC for my review of The Normal Heart – currently running at Arena Stage here in DC. The director and two leading actors helped this show – an intense drama about the first months and years of the AIDS epidemic … Continue reading

Easter and Passover Treats

This year Easter and Passover fall on the same weekend, and families everywhere will be buying their kids chocolate bunnies and making flourless cakes with cocoa powder. In both cases, I hope you’ll consider using chocolate that you know is slave-free. For Christians, tomorrow is Good Friday – a somber day commemorating Christ’s death, in … Continue reading

On Avoiding Columbus Day

For two years in a row, I haven’t written anything on Columbus Day. Most of DC takes the day off so that federal employees can shop the shoes sales and feel the fall breeze. It tends to piss off locals who still have to work, and of course the rest of the country that moves … Continue reading

Sendai, Japan

Almost exactly two years ago I got to visit a close friend in Sendai, Japan. I was fortunate that the cherry blossoms were in bloom and the weather was turning quickly from rainy to wonderful. It was certainly a new experience to be there speaking absolutely no Japanese, but my friend was patient with me … Continue reading

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