Thank Mom for Home

I got into forced migration because of my mother. Her commitment (obsession, almost, along with my dad) to giving me a stable home growing up caused me to feel deeply for people who do not have homes and are forced to wander. A lot of people I’ve met who work with refugees and trafficking victims … Continue reading

The Way of Generous Love

by Gerard Stolk I got up early for the Royal Wedding this morning. There were a ton of living room lights shining in our building, so I wasn’t alone with my high tea and shortbread. Michael eventually joined me, and we watched the BBC broadcast of the event, which was impressively produced (and, as an … Continue reading

Memorializing the Marginalized

Ernst Barlach’s “Schlafende Vagabunden” (Sleeping Drifters) 1912 Yesterday I heard about two homeless men who were killed in Baltimore this past week. A man had tried to rob them, they didn’t have anything, and so then he killed them. It reminded me of a memorial service that is held in Atlanta every year for the … Continue reading

Not a Touchdown Yet

It was really awesome to see how much press human trafficking got before the Super Bowl. It felt like everywhere I turned, from Facebook to local news, people were banding together and joining the cause. I know a number of folks down in Texas added the National Human Trafficking Hotline to their phones, and groups … Continue reading

Let the Little Sparrows Die

It is freezing in DC right now, and I spent the afternoon yesterday watching rain turn to snow from the cafe where I was working. Rain, then sleet actually, then slush, then snow. I was finishing the outline for one last final go at the screenplay I’m adapting from Hungarian playwright Andras Visky’s Juliet. It … Continue reading

Law or Roof?

Polling lines and roofs, Iraq 2005 – public domain When asked about their greatest needs, internally displaced people (IDP) in Iraq list legal help above shelter, sanitation and education. Why? Why request a lawyer before a roof? In general, access to work, food, and shelter have been the most pressing concerns for Iraqi IDP’s since … Continue reading

How Agricultural Slavery Works in the United States

Ansel Adams – Manzanar farm workers and Mt. Williamson, 1943 The continued existence of agricultural slavery might be hard to believe, but exist it does, and at a widespread levels across the globe. What might be even more surprising, especially to American consumers, is the prevalence of slavery on farms across the United States. CIW … Continue reading

Mental Disability and Migration

Recently a New York Times editorial spotlighted a growing problem in the US immigration system: the handling of illegal immigrants who are also mentally disabled. The issue is one that makes compassionate people on either side of the immigration debate fret. How does a nation offering a place for the tired, poor, and huddled deal … Continue reading

Life on the Road

Photo: Olav A. Saltbones/Norwegian Red Cross For the last six months, we have read every sad story imaginable about Haiti and its orphans and widows. We have been frustrated alongside relief workers who can’t get supplies into the hardest-hit places. We have felt the confusion of the government, which wants to rebuild but is paralyzed … Continue reading

4th of July and Weekend Resources

In honor of the 4th of July, I’ve included miss Lady Liberty above. Officially titled “Liberty Enlightening the World,” she is based on the Roman goddess Libertas. And like classical renderings of the goddess, her feet trample broken chains. Inside the exhibit on the second floor, you can find the beautiful sonnet “The New Colossus,” … Continue reading

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