Adam and End-of-Life Care for the Homeless

Our Friend Adam Last week I wrote about my husband’s friend “Adam” in reference to the dangers of being homeless during the hottest parts of summer. Adam had disappeared from where Michael normally spends time with him, but now he’s back. Sadly, he is not well. He was in the hospital because of a minor … Continue reading

Heat Wave and the Homeless

Recently we’ve been feeling a little concerned about one of Michael’s friends, who we’ll call Adam. For the last few months Michael has been spending time each morning with Adam, and sometimes eats breakfast with him. They talk about the city, what they did over the weekend – normal stuff. Adam happens to be homeless, … Continue reading

Thank Mom for Home

I got into forced migration because of my mother. Her commitment (obsession, almost, along with my dad) to giving me a stable home growing up caused me to feel deeply for people who do not have homes and are forced to wander. A lot of people I’ve met who work with refugees and trafficking victims … Continue reading

What’s Poisoning Greene Township?

Barb Reed moved to Greene Township as a teenager in 1975. When she and her husband decided to settle there, they cut their own driveway and built the entire house together, starting with the basement. She was only seventeen years old. “We love where we’re at. We’re in the middle of almost 8 acres. We … Continue reading

Stop Killing LaBelle – Reflections on a Hurting Town

I had trouble finding the town of LaBelle because it is, as mentioned in last week’s article, tiny. But once I did find it and got out of the car, I broke one of the rules I’d already been warned about: I forgot to put on my sunglasses. Within an hour or two my eyes … Continue reading

What’s Killing LaBelle, PA?

  by Joanna Castle Miller When you drive into LaBelle, PA, you might miss it for the view. The steep streets wind around trees turned, this time of year, into bold yellows and oranges. Houses line the Monongahela River on small lots left over from the peak of the town’s coal mining days. A rustic … Continue reading

Cancer Come and Me Wan’ Go Home

Bananas in the Store – by Steve Hopson, http://www.stevehopson.com In the last few decades, a large number of workers have migrated toward the banana plantations. That’s right, toward them. Even though the industry is corrupt and life is hard on a banana farm, many migrants feel any check is better than no check, and bananas … Continue reading

Mental Disability and Migration

Recently a New York Times editorial spotlighted a growing problem in the US immigration system: the handling of illegal immigrants who are also mentally disabled. The issue is one that makes compassionate people on either side of the immigration debate fret. How does a nation offering a place for the tired, poor, and huddled deal … Continue reading

HIV on the Tea Farms

Over the last decade, stories have surfaced about a growing epidemic on Kenya’s tea plantations – an increase in HIV at an alarming rate. Tea pickers near Kericho, Kenya – by Ed Roberts The plantations pay very little, and working on one can be a very difficult life. Mothers wanting to make money for their … Continue reading

Tea and the Marginalized

There may be no greater connection between one world and another than tea. In tea we pick the grasses and leaves of our native lands and ship them to another people who look and think differently than we do. Those people prepare the grasses and leaves in water and consume their essence. We drink the … Continue reading

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