Talking Satire with Song Byeok

I was thrilled this week to get a chance to interview Song Byeok, former State Propaganda Artist for North Korea. Song lost both parents and a sister to the famine of the 1990s that ravaged his homeland. After trying to escape into China to find food, he was tortured by the same government he used … Continue reading

Samizdat: Underground Resistance Made Public

Samizdat means “self-published.” A Russian term, it refers to any underground publication banned during Communist rule in the USSR and Soviet bloc. It includes essays, books, art, poems – whether original or copied, it was all illegal. Yesterday I attended the opening of Samizdat: The Czech Art of Resistance 1968-1989 at the Embassy of the … Continue reading

When Numbers Fail

As I reflect on the many things I learned last week at the Hidden Gulag conference, the power of story stands out the most. Shin Dong-hyuk, who spoke briefly of growing up in a North Korean prison camp, captured everyone’s imagination and brought a room full of DC businesspeople to tears. His co-authored autobiography Escape … Continue reading

Ferdinand and Isabella Were Cowards.

In researching for a writing project I came across my old books on Judaism in Spain from when I was living in Madrid. In particular I found my copy of the Alhambra Decree, or the 1492 Charter of the Expulsion of the Jews. The Spanish Inquisition had been underway for a while at that point, … Continue reading

Human Rights in China: An Interview with the Laogai Museum’s Harry Wu

I recently visited the Laogai Museum and wrote a bit about it for We Love DC. In the process I also spoke with the museum’s director Harry Wu. Wu is a survivor of the Laogai prisons – a forced labor system in China to which he was sentenced for political crimes. After moving to the … Continue reading

Good News Friday

As of last night, the Mavericks are one game away from winning the NBA title and defeating that pesky James/Wade duo in Miami. If THAT isn’t enough good news, here’s some more: Hollywood Unites for Iranian Filmmakers Iranian artists have it tough. They are certainly at extremely high risk for wrongful imprisonment or becoming prisoners … Continue reading

Social Media and Human Rights

Social media has opened a pathway to democracy. While I am gathering a group for a party over Facebook, other people more oppressed than I am are gathering for revolution and recording atrocities on their smartphones. Amnesty International’s 2011 report: The State of the World’s Human Rights opens with an introduction about this phenomenon and … Continue reading

To Libya

Libyan Protesters in DuPont Circle, Washington D.C. / June 2010 For nearly two weeks I’ve been watching with excitement and dread as the Libyan people have fought, bled, and died fighting against their dictatorial regime. I feel a special closeness to the people there, even though we’ve never met and mostly differ in language, religion, … Continue reading

Not a Touchdown Yet

It was really awesome to see how much press human trafficking got before the Super Bowl. It felt like everywhere I turned, from Facebook to local news, people were banding together and joining the cause. I know a number of folks down in Texas added the National Human Trafficking Hotline to their phones, and groups … Continue reading

Media in Exile

Newspaper mural on Berlin Wall – by Pashan T.P. Mishra, author of the Handbook for Journalists in Exile, recently came out with a guide to help refugees start their own media in their host countries. It is a guide for true journalists. People who fled home to find freedom of speech, among other things, have … Continue reading

  • Copyright

    ©TheMarginalized.com