Hunger + Hunger = Generosity

In researching a writing project, I recently came across what has to be one of the most beautiful stories in American history. Perhaps you’re already familiar with the Choctaw Indians and their incredible display of generosity during the 1840s. Regardless, read on because it’s worth the reminder: Beginning in the early 1830s, the US government … Continue reading

Washing Our Hands of Iraq’s Missing Million

I mentioned some scary numbers in yesterday’s post – in particular that anywhere from 250,000 to 1 million Iraqis have disappeared in recent years and not yet been found by their loved ones. These numbers come from three major eras in Iraq’s recent history: War with Iran: Enforced disappearances occurred relatively often in Iraq during … Continue reading

Going Local to Stop Displacement

Yet another reason to go to the farmers’ market! Around the world, federal governments and corporations have entered a new “global gold rush” – for agricultural land. They buy up property to use in the coming food crisis and cross national borders for the cheapest and most underused plots. But while purchasing these huge chunks … Continue reading

Good News Friday

Better late than never! Here’s some good news to take into your weekend: Rise of Activism Against Child Slavery in the Uzbek Cotton Industry: After a somewhat successful petition on Change.org meant to raise awareness for and protest the use of forced child labor in the cotton industry, activists are riding the momentum to demand … Continue reading

My Decade of War

I cried on September 11th because I worried it would affect my plans to attend NYU. Yep, I was that immature. I was in high school. Like most people I was also terrified that we were going to war, that the people I loved might die, and that the country as we knew it would … Continue reading

Follow-up to “Stuck Between There and Nowhere”

[This is a follow-up to my article at Reject Apathy about refugees who suffer from being encamped long-term, and possible solutions to the problem. Check it out!] For those who have read it, here are some additional ways you can get involved with this issue: Look past the emergency – Often once the media hype … Continue reading

Good News Friday: Statelessness

This week marks the 50th anniversary of the Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness. Statelessness means a lack of citizenship. It happens for a variety of reasons, including racial discrimination, unsuccessful asylum attempts, and being in the wrong place at the wrong time during a war. Some families have been stateless for generations. Statelessness can … Continue reading

Ways to Help Famine Victims in the Horn of Africa

Somalia and neighboring countries are facing the worst drought in 60 years, which has led to severe famine affecting approximately 10 million people. Hundreds of thousands of people – the majority women and children – have been displaced in the Horn of Africa. As in most cases of humanitarian crisis, one of the best ways … Continue reading

Beledweyne Banner Image

I’ve used the above photograph for a number of projects, including an adapted version for this blog’s header. It shows refugee huts in Beledweyne and was taken by a United States sergeant during official duties, which places it in the public domain. Beledweyne is one of the oldest cities in Somalia, but recent decades of … Continue reading

Not a Touchdown Yet

It was really awesome to see how much press human trafficking got before the Super Bowl. It felt like everywhere I turned, from Facebook to local news, people were banding together and joining the cause. I know a number of folks down in Texas added the National Human Trafficking Hotline to their phones, and groups … Continue reading

  • Copyright

    ©TheMarginalized.com