Growing Up Without AIDS

What I remember most about AIDS growing up is the silence. In Memphis, where more than one friend actually went to ex-gay camp, I don’t remember hearing much about the disease that has now killed over 30 million people. To be fair, I also don’t remember any hateful statements about how AIDS cures homosexuality. No, … Continue reading

Easter and Passover Treats

This year Easter and Passover fall on the same weekend, and families everywhere will be buying their kids chocolate bunnies and making flourless cakes with cocoa powder. In both cases, I hope you’ll consider using chocolate that you know is slave-free. For Christians, tomorrow is Good Friday – a somber day commemorating Christ’s death, in … Continue reading

Ferdinand and Isabella Were Cowards.

In researching for a writing project I came across my old books on Judaism in Spain from when I was living in Madrid. In particular I found my copy of the Alhambra Decree, or the 1492 Charter of the Expulsion of the Jews. The Spanish Inquisition had been underway for a while at that point, … Continue reading

Human Rights in China: An Interview with the Laogai Museum’s Harry Wu

I recently visited the Laogai Museum and wrote a bit about it for We Love DC. In the process I also spoke with the museum’s director Harry Wu. Wu is a survivor of the Laogai prisons – a forced labor system in China to which he was sentenced for political crimes. After moving to the … Continue reading

Dirty Laundry

I’ve been reading up lately on a scandal in Ireland surrounding the Magdalene laundries/asylums. In case you’re unfamiliar with these crazy horrible places (as I was until just recently), here’s a quick run-through: Protestants and Catholics set up Magdalene laundries in Ireland – and elsewhere on a smaller scale – as a way to reform … Continue reading

Jeremiahs or Babel-Builders?

This article depresses me. And this one. And this one. If you can believe it, what gets me down is not the slideshow from the Washington Post showing victims of the Horn of Africa famine. What depresses me is that, with my husband studying most days now, I have few people to talk with about … Continue reading

Osama Bin Laden and Our Culture of Death

I might be the only person on Earth besides a terrorist to feel sad when I found out Osama Bin Laden was dead. It wasn’t because I liked the guy. It was because I woke up at around 1am last night to shouting, chanting, and even some illegal fireworks outside my window. Groggy and annoyed, … Continue reading

What Are You Giving for Lent?

Last spring I decided that I would give up slave-made chocolate and I invited other people to join me. It happened to be around Ash Wednesday, so it became a sort of Lenten observation, and a number of friends, family and readers jumped on board. Now it has been a year. A whole year! It’s … Continue reading

The Unreasonableness of Love

Late last week I received an e-mail from Voice of the Martyrs, an organization dedicated to helping Christians around the world who face religious persecution. The e-mail tells of a Christian lawyer in northwestern Pakistan who was defending another Christian in court against exorbitant interest rates. His name was Edwin Paul, and he had been … Continue reading

Why Palestine?

Recently this blog began dedicating a regular column to the Israeli/Palestinian situation – its conflicts, its history, and most importantly, its people. Why write about Palestine on a blog about forced migration? They seem pretty settled, with homes and jobs. The Palestinian experience usually looks nothing like that of women in the Congo, fleeing for … Continue reading

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