…and a black woman (trigger warning)

Three Young White Men and a Black Woman / Christiaen van Couwenbergh, 1632 / Musée des Beaux-Arts, Strasbourg The Bath / Jean-Léon Gérome, ca. 1880–1885 / Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, Mildred Anna Williams Collection

Children Become Artists Become Journalists Become Darfur.

You’re fluent in international development, human rights law, medicine, or the arts? That’s amazing! But when it comes to rallying the rest of us, sometimes we need to be sold on the idea in our own native tongue, with strong communication. I was just talking with a co-worker about the need for non-profits to translate … Continue reading

“Roadkill” – a Bus Ride to Human Trafficking

I’ve received a lot of invitations to plays about human trafficking. At first, I’d go. I wanted to support the organizations fighting this problem and see how they use theater to raise awareness. But, I have to be honest, many of them felt contrived at best. Most seemed to glory in the suffering, a la … Continue reading

Relating to a Plea from China

Last month a Falun Gong practitioner and former prisoner in China admitted to writing a letter found by an Oregonian woman in her K-mart Halloween decorations. The letter alleges the product was made in a Chinese labor camp by prisoners who work 15 hours a day and face torture and abuse. It requests, “Sir: If … Continue reading

The Stolen Generations

How do you say “sorry” for stealing a generation of children from their parents? Well, if you’re Australian, you just say “sorry.” Wednesday the 13th marks the 5th anniversary of the “Stolen Generations Apology.” The newly-installed Prime Minister of Australia, in consultation with aboriginal leaders, gave the speech after many requests for a formal government … Continue reading

Sticking with Love

I am enjoying the fruits of other people’s labor. 15 years ago my parents collaborated with a woman named Mia Scarlat to start an organization for children in Bucharest who needed a safe place to go. Mia had the expertise, my family had the concerned American donors, and with a very small budget the group … Continue reading

Convict Porters and the Long Mile

Earlier this week, I interviewed my husband Michael about some of the human rights concerns in Burma / Myanmar. In his answer, he cited the problem of forced portering, in which the Burmese army takes people from villages and forces them to walk with heavy loads on their backs. This form of slavery has particular … Continue reading

On Burma: An Interview with Michael Miller

Recently I discussed some problems plaguing South Sudan and announced my husband will be working with that country as a research associate for PILPG. But there’s a second country he’s assisting, too: Burma! Since he just finished his first year of law school, he has some time on his hands for a few weeks. So … Continue reading

Guantanamo: Ten Years Later

Tomorrow Guantanamo turns 10, and all over the country protestors plan to mark the day with calls to close the prison center. In particular, activists will travel from around the United States to Washington, DC, for a rally and human chain meant to stretch from the White House to the Capitol. In the last 10 … Continue reading

Ending the “Kill and Dump” Policy in Balochistan

I’ll be the first to admit I don’t know much about Balochistan. (Balochi-what? Is that the place Herman Cain calls Stan-Stan?) No, Balochistan is in the southwest region of Pakistan. It spans nearly half of the country, but the population is much more sparse, making up only 5%. And it’s getting sparser… Enforced disappearances in … Continue reading

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